On Death & Resurrection

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On Death & Resurrection is an excerpt from the ongoing Metatext: Rebound by Iosefa Elgin, a scholar excommunicated from the Church of Deneir for the heretical efforts to reconstruct the Metatext, her god's annal of lost and hidden knowledge.

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A thin and pliable volume, smelling faintly of dust.

Properties

  • Books
  • Rarity: Common
  •  Weight: 0.5 kg / 1 lb
  • Price: 14 gp
  • UID BOOK_GEN_World_MetatextResurrection
    UUID d82f1cad-4947-426d-8ebb-06115462cf3b


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Text

[An excerpt from the ongoing Metatext: Rebound by Iosefa Elgin, a scholar excommunicated from the Church of Deneir for the heretical efforts to reconstruct the Metatext, her god's annal of lost and hidden knowledge.]

Of what value is a life? Far too esoteric a topic to warrant any serious critical consideration between these pages, surely - or so it would seem at first glance.


But once we push aside the mysticism and dewy-eyed sentiment so often clouding our assessment, it is clear that across all the spinning planes, each and every life does indeed have a quantifiable value. It is simply that not all are equally valuable.


Consider: we already know that the destruction of our material form is not the end. If anything, our souls are more free after death, transcending planar barriers in search of a resting place that best befits our deeds, beliefs, and station in life. But even this assessment is subject to market forces: Lord Kelemvor weighing our souls against how thoroughly we have given them over to other gods, empowering them in turn.


There is, of course, an alternate route: not at the end of the path, but the chance to retread it. Clerics across the Realms wield the power to return life to any soul deemed worthy or willing enough. It is strange, then, that these so frequently intersect with those deemed wealthy enough, for the components for such a spell are beyond the means of most mortals.


I have interviewed those who have made such a return, and in truth have found them to be of the most dull and unimaginative sort that I cannot possibly imagine what it is they were so eager to return to.


If a true assessment of the journey is to be made, then there is simply no replacement for embarking upon it oneself. Perhaps, one day, this great volume of learning will make me worthy enough to walk that path - and wealth enough to return.